Social services evidence

When we’re asked to produce an evidence summary or review, we use a wide range of evidence sources to make sure we’re finding research, reports of activities, evaluations and discussions around the topic from a variety of voices and perspectives. Over the past few months we’ve been testing out different sources of useful evidence, considering which websites may be of relevance when we’re doing focused searches, and looking for alternative ways of accessing research that is not publicly available and to which we don’t have access through subscriptions. We thought it would be useful to share these resources, so that people working in the social services across Scotland (and beyond) could try out these evidence sources for themselves. Some search tools and databases are more appealing to use them others, and some have more relevant information than others for particular topics. We’re learning more about them every day, but what we really want to know, is – what do you think about social services evidence sources?

We’d love to know what you think, so we’ve created a Google document of social services evidence sources with a bit of description about what some of them are and how they collect and organise research and other evidence. Comments are open on the document and this blog post, so please feel free to add your thoughts for example about usability of different sources, what challenges you might encounter when you use them, why you would or would not use them. Getting an insight into the challenges and perceptions of people working in social services and wanting to use evidence will help us tailor our workshops and one to one support, as well as to help us, if necessary, to challenge information providers to make their systems more open and accessible. And of course, if you think there are sources that should be included, please make suggestions.

If taking a look at these evidence sources gets you wanting to know more, please feel free to get in touch with us at Iriss ESSS to talk about one to one support or organising a workshop. You’re welcome to come to us in Glasgow, or we can come to you.

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